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Macleod veteran receives Bomber Command Bar

bomber command

Veterans Affairs Minister Julian Fantino presented the Bomber Command Bar to veterans at a ceremony in Calgary. Back row, from left: William Baxter and Adam James Brinker. Middle row, from left: Clifford Black, Douglas Goodwin, George Braithewaite and Harold Branton. Front row, from left: Harold Kearl, Donald George Irwin, Minister Fantino, Robert Peterson and Henry Ernst.

doug goodwin

Veterans Affairs Minister Julian Fantino presented the Bomber Command Bar to Doug Goodwin of Fort Macleod on Wednesday in Calgary.

A Fort Macleod man was among veterans who received the new Bomber Command Bar on Wednesday.
Doug Goodwin accepted the new medal from Veterans Affairs Minister Julian Fantino during a special ceremony at The Military Museums of Calgary.
“Today, I am very pleased to present this very special honour to those Canadians who fought for peace, freedom and democracy through their service in Bomber Command,” Fantino said.
Canada played a vital role in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan jointly undertaken by Great Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.
Graduates of the air training plan formed the backbone of Bomber Command.
Many of the Canadians who trained under this program served with Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons in the No. 6 Bomber Group — the only non-British group to serve in Bomber Command.
By the end of the Second World War, No. 6 Bomber Group had carried out more than 40,000 sorties and approximately 8,000 decorations for bravery were awarded to its members.
The government of Canada created the Bomber Command Bar to formally recognize all the brave Canadians who served in this dangerous air campaign during the Second World War.
In addition to the creation of the Bomber Command Bar, the government of Canada also helped to create the new Bomber Command Memorial in London, United Kingdom. This memorial honours all members of the Bomber Command from Allied countries and those who made the ultimate sacrifice.
Goodwin enlisted in the RCAF in St. John, New Brunswick in 1943 and became an air gunner.
Goodwin received his training through the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan at bases in Quebec.
Goodwin received his training through the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan at bases in Quebec.
Goodwin’s father, who was a World War One veteran, pinned wings on his son at the graduation ceremony.
Goodwin then boarded a ship at Halifax and sailed to Scotland. Because he was trained as an air gunner, Goodwin served as a gunner on the Empress of Scotland on its way to Scotland.
When he arrived in England Goodwin, a mid upper gunner, soon found himself as part of a crew with a pilot, engineer, bomb aimer, navigator, wireless air gunner and a tail gunner.
Goodwin continued his training for a time in England on Halifax bombers and in December 1944 was posted to the Snowy Owl Squadron in 6 Group.
The mid upper turret, where Goodwin manned the four Browning .303 machine guns, was comfortable.
Goodwin’s crew completed 15 missions over Germany, taking off about 6 p.m. and flying five to seven hours on a round trip.
After 15 missions Goodwin was transferred to 11 Tiger Force to train for Bomber Command’s mission against Japan.
Before 11 Tiger Force could join the campaign the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrendered.

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