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Grizzly trapped in Porcupine Hills

LAWRENCE GLEASON, GAZETTE CONTRIBUTOR
A seven-year-old mature boar grizzly has been trapped in the Porcupine Hills to be relocated to Nordegg.
Coun. Glen Alm reported the trapping of the bear to MD of Willow Creek Agricultural Service Board on April 10.
“There are probably four full adult bears that have killed cattle, along with three sub-adults,” Alm said.
The sub-adults are estimated to be 1 1/2 to two years old, and are likely to have been with adult bears when killing cattle, Alm said.
The bears are estimated to be roaming an area of about 30 square miles in the Porcupine Hills.
“We need to try to educate all the neighbours the dead stock removal program is pretty important,” Alm said.
There is a dead stock pick-up service available for ranchers operating in the Porcupine Hills, and more information on that can be provided by the MD of Willow Creek Agricultural Service Board.
“In my lifetime I’d never seen a grizzly bear until four years ago,” Alm said. “It is pretty quickly becoming a serious problem.”
The dead stock program is an attempt to prevent both wolves and grizzly bears from learning there are easy pickings on ranches and to encourage the bears to kill game instead.
“At this rate it won’t be long before the grizzlies come down right into Claresholm or Fort Macleod, as they will be following the watershed,” Alm said.
The grizzly bear that has been trapped has also been tagged.
The tag is not equipped with a global positioning sensor, so the bear’s location will not be able to be tracked.
However, if the bear is trapped in this area again wildlife officers will know if it is the second trapping of the bear in the Porcupine Hills.
“If that happens the bear may be removed permanently,” Alm said.

1 Comments For This Post

  1. B Mun Says:

    The comments from Alm… never seen, ‘ain’t never been’ ‘won’t be long till they’re roaming into town, (fear) – paraphrasing, Grizzly bears are traditionally a plains omnivore, that were driven into the mountains, learn to live with them, they belong there as well, accept your environmental responsibility or sell your ranch to someone that gets today’s realities. Good luck with co habitation and tolerance my friend, it ain’t all about your beef